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ÖZÇELİK, PINAR

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    One simple question detects motion sickness susceptibility in migraine patients
    (2024-03-01) AKDAL HALMAGYI G.; Özçelik P.; BALCI B.; Halmágyi G. M.; Ünal B.; ÖZÇELİK, PINAR
    Objective: To find out if motion sickness susceptibility (MSS) of vestibular migraine (VM) patients and migraine only (MO) patients can be reliably detected with a single simple question: \"Can you read while travelling in a car without getting motion sick?\". Method: Ninety-two definite VM and 58 MO patients and 74 healthy control (HC) subjects were asked about their MSS and about being able to read while riding in a car without becoming motion sick. A Motion Sickness Susceptibility Questionnaire (MSSQ-Short) including childhood (MSA), adulthood (MSB) and total (MST) parts was also administered to all participants. ROC curves of MSSQ-Short were prepared for \"not being able to read in a car\" as the gold standard. Results: Mean MSA scores were significantly higher in both VM and MO patients than in HCs (p < 0.001), but their scores were not significantly different (p = 0.171). Mean MSB and MST scores were significantly higher in VM than in MO patients (p < 0.001) and both VM and MO patients had significantly higher scores than HCs (p < 0.001). MSA scores were significantly higher than MSB scores in MO patients (p < 0.001). All sections of the questionnaire were associated with high area-under-curve values for MSS detected by the question about being able to read in a car without becoming motion sick. Conclusion: We propose that all migraine patients could have the same level of MSS in childhood but MO patients are able to compensate over years, but VM patients are not. A quick way to determine MSS is to ask about the ability to read without becoming motion sickness while riding a car.