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TEZGEL, OKAN

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OKAN
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TEZGEL
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  • PublicationOpen Access
    Comparison of Single and Double Incision Repair Techniques in Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture
    (2022-08-01T00:00:00Z) KAPICIOĞLU, Mehmet; Pulatkan, Anil; UÇAN, VAHDET; TEZGEL, OKAN; Bilsel, Kerem; KAPICIOĞLU, MEHMET; UÇAN, VAHDET; TEZGEL, OKAN; BİLSEL, İSMAIL KEREM
    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the complications and functional outcomes of single versus doubleincision repair techniques for the treatment of distal biceps brachii tendon rupture Methods: Between 2012 and 2018, patients with distal biceps brachii tendon rupture who were treated with a single or doubleincision repair technique were included in this retrospective study. Range of motion (ROM) and Mayo elbow performance scores (MEPS) were evaluated. Results: Seventeen patients with a mean age of 45.6±6.4 years (range: 34-58 years) who underwent single (n=9) and double (n=8) incision techniques were included in this study. The mean followup was 33±10.5 months (range: 24-62 months). Preoperative and postoperative ROM and MEPS were similar between two groups (p>0.05). In the single incision repair technique group, 3 patients had lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve (LACN) palsy and 1 patient was re-operated due to re-rupture. In the double incision repair technique group, 1 patient had posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy and 1 patient had hematoma that did not require surgical drainage. No significant differences were detected in terms of complications (p=0.62). Conclusion: Good functional results were obtained after both single and double incision techniques for the treatment of distal biceps brachii tendon rupture. Both single and double incision techniques were reliable however LACN was at risk in single incision technique and PIN in double incision technique.
  • PublicationMetadata only
    Clinical Outcomes of Two-Stage Implantation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Postinfectious End-Stage Glenohumeral Arthritis in Native Shoulders: A Single-Center Cohort Study with a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up
    (2023-04-01) Bilgin E.; Tezgel O.; UÇAN V.; KAPICIOĞLU M.; Turgut A.; Bilsel K.; TEZGEL, OKAN; UÇAN, VAHDET; KAPICIOĞLU, MEHMET; BİLSEL, İSMAIL KEREM
    Background: Septic arthritis of the shoulder is a rare but devastating condition that may lead to joint destruction. There are few studies and limited outcome data on shoulder arthroplasty for infected native shoulders with end-stage glenohumeral arthritis (GHA). Hence, this study aimed to demonstrate the clinical outcomes of two-stage implantation in reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) using an antibiotic spacer in the first stage for this challenging condition. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study on two-stage implantation in RSA in infected shoulders. Patients were diagnosed with end-stage GHA due to primary shoulder sepsis or infection following non-arthroplasty shoulder surgery. Laboratory data, range of motion (ROM), and functional scores including American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Constant score, and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score were assessed prior to spacer placement and at the latest follow-up. Furthermore, intraoperative and postoperative complications were recorded. Results: In this study, 10 patients with a mean age of 54.8 ± 15.8 years (range, 30–77 years) were included. The mean follow-up period was 37.3 ± 9.1 months (range, 25–56 months). All postoperative ROM measurements and functional scores were improved significantly. Although no reinfection was observed, a total of 5 complications including 2 hematomas, 1 intraoperative humeral fracture, 1 humeral stem loosening, and 1 anterior deltoid dysfunction were observed in 4 patients after a follow-up period of at least 2 years after RSA. Conclusions: Two-stage implantation in RSA is an effective method for improving the function and controlling the infection in postinfectious end-stage GHA in native shoulders.