Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAshuntantang, Gloria E
dc.contributor.authorKAZANCIOĞLU, RÜMEYZA
dc.contributor.authorHtay, Htay
dc.contributor.authorAlrukhaimi, Mona
dc.contributor.authorBello, Aminu K.
dc.contributor.authorHarris, David C
dc.contributor.authorFeehally, John
dc.contributor.authorbraum, branko
dc.contributor.authorgharbiğ, mohammed benghanem
dc.contributor.authorBellorin-Fort, Ezequil
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-05T12:37:56Z
dc.date.available2019-10-05T12:37:56Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-01
dc.identifier
dc.identifier.citationHtay H., Alrukhaimi M., Ashuntantang G. E. , Bello A. K. , Bellorin-Fort E., gharbiğ m. b. , braum b., Feehally J., Harris D. C. , KAZANCIOĞLU R., -Global access of patients with kidney disease to health technologies and medications: findings from the Global Kidney Health Atlas project-, KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL SUPPLEMENTS, cilt.8, ss.27-29, 2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12645/217
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6336224/
dc.description.abstractAccess to essential medications and health products is critical to effective management of kidney disease. Using data from the ISN Global Kidney Health Atlas multinational cross-sectional survey, global access of patients with kidney disease to essential medications and health products was examined. Overall, 125 countries participated, with 118 countries, composing 91.5% of the world's population, providing data on this domain. Most countries were unable to access eGFR and albuminuria in their primary care settings. Only one-third of low-income countries (LICs) were able to measure serum creatinine and none were able to access eGFR or quantify proteinuria. The ability to monitor diabetes mellitus through serum glucose and glycated hemoglobin measurements was suboptimal. Pathology services were rarely available in tertiary care in LICs (12%) and lower middle-income countries (45%). While acute and chronic hemodialysis services were available in almost all countries, acute and chronic peritoneal dialysis services were rarely available in LICs (18% and 29%, respectively). Kidney transplantation was available in 79% of countries overall and in 12% of LICs. While over one-half of all countries publicly funded RRT and kidney medications with or without copayment, this was less common in LICs and lower middle-income countries. In conclusion, this study demonstrated significant gaps in services for kidney care and funding that were most apparent in LICs and lower middle-income countries.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectFunding for health care
dc.subjectAcute kidney injury
dc.subjectChronic kidney disease care
dc.subjectGlobal health care
dc.subjectRenal replacement therapy
dc.subjectKidney
dc.titleGlobal access of patients with kidney disease to health technologies and medications: findings from the Global Kidney Health Atlas project
dc.typeArticle
local.avesis.response
local.article.journalnameFİZYOTERAPİ REHABİLİTASYON
local.org.facultyTıp Fakültesi
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000435181200005
dc.identifier.scopus85041684684
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.kisu.2017.10.010
dc.identifier.pubmed30675440
local.publication.isinternational1


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record